Sunday, April 14, 2019

South Bend Heavy 10 (10L) Build

So, with the Heavy 10 Lathe Headstock I purchased to put on my junior bed, after realizing I'd made a mistake and bought an under drive headstock that wouldn't work with the Junior I had, I knew I'd need to just build me another lathe.  This one would be tough because I had to buy a lot of pieces from eBay sellers and then assemble them into a hopefully-functional lathe.  It's a lot of money to throw at a hope, but I'd done it before with the car.

With the headstock, I had to then purchase :

  • Lathe bed
  • Lathe bed feet and adjusters
  • Spindle
  • Spindle Pulley
  • Spindle Bull Gear
  • Spindle drive gear
  • Spindle thrust bearing
  • Spindle thrust (outboard) bearing and lock nut
  • Back gears
  • Chuck (still not purchased)
  • 5C adapter for the 10L spindle
  • Face plate
  • Reverse tumbler assembly
  • Banjo
  • Idler gear
  • Gear box drive gear
  • Gear cover
  • Headstock hold down bolts
  • Quick Change Gear Box
  • Lead screw end holder
  • Lead Screw
  • Apron (and gears)
  • Saddle
  • Cross slide
  • Cross slide gib and screw
  • Cross slide hand wheel and screw
  • Compound base and hold down pins/set screws
  • Compound slide
  • Compound slide gib and screw
  • Tailstock base
  • Tailstock hold down clamp
  • Tailstock
  • Tailstock ram
  • Tailstock lead screw
  • Tailstock dial
  • Tailstock hand wheel
  • Tailstock ram spring
  • Tailstock lock

That's a pretty big list.  The "good" thing about this is I can clean up the parts and paint them before assembly.  I started with a 4-foot bed (a little more space over the Junior would be nice).  I didn't get that until late March - and immediately stripped down the bed and feet, scraped it clean (and into specifications) and masked it off to paint.

The lathe bed came with a saddle, and I picked up the compound base and slide from the same seller along with a lead screw for the bed.  He did not have the compound base screws - those were ordered on eBay - nor did he have the cross slide (also ordered off of eBay).

The tailstock was interesting in that someone sold it cheaply on eBay (if you call $60 cheap) because they couldn't get the ram screw, ram, and a drill chuck apart.  That was joyous.  I think the seller didn't realize it's a left-handed ram screw, once I got the screw out.  It had been modified for a hand-lever instead of a hand-wheel.


It was a short and quick stripping/cleaning/scraping of the tailstock.  I then masked off the tailstock and painted that up.  I needed a tailstock screw, so I used the current tailstock screw to measure the surfaces, and then ordered a chuck of left-handed, 1/2" ACME screw threaded rod.  I turned it between centers to get the threads off, then Loc-tite was added to the shaft and a piece of steel was put over the shaft and also pinned.  Unfortunately, I turned the features down BEFORE connecting it to the threaded rod - if you have to do it, turn the features down AFTER you anchor it to the threaded rod.  Luckily, I found out that the features I had turned were the wrong size, so I had to put it back on the lathe between centers and turn it down, so it all worked out.





I got the tailstock painted and re-assembled, and it works excellent!  It was time to work on the cross slide (I had ordered a cross slide from eBay).

I tracked down on eBay a compound slide gib, and from another seller I picked up the compound screw, dial, and hand wheel assembly.  I could not find a gib screw.  I do not have a rotary broach, so I needed to find a gib screw, and ended up taking a chance at a gib screw from an 11" lathe.  Note to self, the 11" lathes used a 5/16-18 gib screw, while the heavy 10's used a 1/4-20.  Still, I turned it down to get the screw head the right size, cut the threads off to get down to 1/4", then put a 20 pitch thread on it.  Works like a champ!

I cleaned the headstock, and masked it off.  I was able to get it painted, but have yet to install the headstock parts I'd ordered.

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